Monday, August 4, 2014

World War I ... where are the voices of the pacifists?

Good morning everyone,

I hope this day finds you well, gardening, cycling, reading, or wall climbing ... whatever activity you enjoy!

This morning's CBC had yet another mention of the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the first world war ... an important event without doubt: did I hear the number 8,000,000 as the number who died?

There's been a series on CBC, a re-discovery of interviews with WWI veterans done 50 years ago.  TVO is about to run the 4th part of a series, which shows worse images each part.

Commemoration services are across the country, and probably across the world.

What I have yet to hear on the admittedly few media I follow is information about people who were against the war.  I'd like to hear their ideas, know how they served in non-combat roles.  What little I do know - and you might laugh at my source - comes from Agatha Christie's stories.  She made several mentions of those who objected to the war who served as ambulance drivers and medics (right at the front), in hospitals, and generally in very difficult physical jobs.  They "served" but did not serve in ways they had to kill.

And that is what any war is about: killing.  Film from WWI - on the TVO series - does not hide the bodies, the amputations, the facial disfigurements, the pain.  One hundred years ago ... whatever kind of lives did the men with horrible facial disfigurement have?  I bet they didn't go out of their homes, or hold jobs.  The culture was that way; such people were hidden. 

None of the war shows so far has talked about the agricultural disruption, the education disruption that must have occurred for children. 

And, from the TVO series, even at the end of the first episode, all I could think was: men need to be kept inside their homes where they cannot get at each other.  I'll be kinder here and say, political leaders.  Political leaders need to be put in a locked room until they sort out whatever the personal power trip is that they are on. And if they kill each other, send in the second in command and let them stay in with the bodies and work it out. Don't involve the intelligent and capable men, women and children of a country in a boundary dispute or a resource dispute.

Perhaps let the problems be resolved by grandmothers or kindergarten teachers, people who have a proven track record of teaching how to share and be kind to one another.

The above is badly expressed, I realize.

Listening to the voices of soldiers from nearly 100 years ago, seeing photos of bodies piled on bodies ... and then listening to today's news of Ukraine, Gaza, Syria ...

... it's being done wrong ... it's being handled wrong ... I don't know the answers, or even the questions ... but I know it's wrong.

Sincerely and with kindest regards,

Why's Woman

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